Six reasons to love gulls

Gulls are not exactly everyone’s favourite birds. They’re often fairly plain and overlooked, and some of the more piratical ones have taken to violently stealing people’s chips and ice cream.

I must admit there have been days when I’ve cursed them myself, when I’ve spent fruitless hours standing in the freezing cold, scanning thousands of very similar-looking gulls, hopelessly trying to find one of the rarer species.

But there are plenty of reasons to love gulls, and here are six of them.

They readily pose for photos

This cannot be said of most birds I try to take photos of, which often end up being nothing more than an indistinct blur or a distant blob. Herring Gulls and Black-headed Gulls are particularly amenable to posing for pictures. Look at these poseurs.

Herring Gull perched on amusements sign.

This Herring Gull fancies a flutter in the arcade at Filey.

Black-headed Gull, Windermere

This handsome Black-headed Gull in its breeding plumage was happy to pose on a post on the shore of Windermere.

They’re actually quite beautiful after all

Look at these Kittiwakes – such immaculate little gulls, and they would never pinch your chips.

Kittiwakes on Inner Farne

A pair of Kittiwakes on Inner Farne.

The cry of a gull reminds me of the sea

I love being by the sea, and the call of gulls – usually Herring Gulls (yes, they’re the robbing ones, but there are some nice ones, honest) – is immediately evocative of trips to the seaside, digging on the beach and paddling in the sea. And the distinctive, repetitive call of Kittiwakes immediately takes me back to the precariously balanced colonies I’ve seen at Bempton, Filey and Seahouses.

Herring Gull in flight.

A Herring Gull flies overhead, possibly on the look-out for an opportunist snack.

They’re more varied than you might think

Yes, most gulls are some variation of white, grey and black, but the imposing Great Black-backed Gull is a very different beast to the dainty Little Gull, which remains a bogey bird for me. Then there’s the endless variety of plumages, depending on the time of year and age of the bird. Telling the difference is potentially a rewarding challenge – not one I’ve managed to succeed at myself yet.

Great Black-backed Gull, Seahouses.

Great Black-backed Gulls are huge beasts.

They have different characters

Common Gulls seem pretty shy birds that are happy to blend in and not make a fuss, whereas Herring Gulls strut around like they own everywhere and everything.

Herring Gull perched on a sign.

“None shall pass,” says Sentinel Herring Gull.

You can find them everywhere

You don’t have to be by the sea to see gulls. There are large colonies of Black-headed Gulls at inland wetlands, sometimes along with Mediterranean Gulls, and in the winter you can find massive numbers of gulls on rubbish tips or hanging about in fields.

Black-headed Gull, winter plumage.

A Black-headed Gull in its winter plumage takes a bracing dip at Fairburn Ings, Yorkshire.

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